Seagull attacks on the increase


Given the amount of recent bad press our coastal Seagulls are receiving of late we at Eco Environmental would like to share a few thoughts about the current situation.

Populations of any living thing depend on two things - habitat and food supply. Seagulls are bold and opportunistic creatures and have little fear when stealing food from us.

We have caused a rise in urban populations of Seagulls (mostly lesser Black Backed Gulls and Herring Gulls, although of late it appears that Herring Gulls are on the decrease) because we have removed fish from the sea, provided landfill sites and fast food waste and built superb artificial nests commonly referred to as building roofs and chimney stacks.

We also run a superbly efficient feeding programme – Seagull-friendly litter bins, refuse sacks rather than wheelie bins, and holidaymakers throwing chips to admire the aerobatics of hungry birds.

Seagull attacks happen when birds are protecting chicks from perceived threats. Parent gulls have a real issue with personal space when nesting and when young birds learn to fly, this is when the Seagulls swing into full protective mode.

The most simplest way to tackle this ever growing problem would be for all Local Councils to work with and encourage building owners (domestic and commercial) to deter the Seagulls from nesting on their properties by installing a variety of effective, non-harmful Deterrent Systems.

Seagulls are protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. It is an offence to injure, kill or harm the gulls. In certain circumstances the nests or eggs can be removed under licence from Natural England – further information can be found here http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1981/69

Please call us direct on 01752 669009 to talk to your local Bird Control team for free advice or to arrange a site risk assessment survey.

Published 27th July 2015

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